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Embassy of the Republic of the Sudan in Berlin

سفارة جمهورية السودان ببرلين

Welcome to Sudan

S.E. Badreldin M. Abdalla. The Ambassador, his Welcoming to the official Website of the Embassy...

 

 The full Post حبابكم عشرة 

Embassy Working Hours

ساعات العمل بالسفارة 

Mon-Fri:    09:30h  - 16:00h

Sudan Holidays 2017 Sudan Holidays 2017

 

Consulate Working Hours

ساعات عمل القسم القنصلي 

Mon-Thu:    09:30h  - 14:00h
Friday:       09:30h  - 12:00h

 Very Important هام جداً

 

إعلان بشأن الترشح للوظائق الدولية

ترجو سفارة جمهورية السودان في برلين من جميع المواطنين السودانيين الدين يودون الترشح لوظائف وعضوية اللجان في منظمات الأمم المتحدة ووكالاتها المختصة، والمنظمات والمؤسسات الدولية... المزيد

 

Sudanese Night

The Embassy öf the Republic of Sudan

 in Berlin. invite you to the Sudanese Night as part of Africa day celebration in Warsaw. ..more

Video Presentation (HD)

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هاتف القسم القنصلي لسفارة السودان في برلين ☎ 60 111 887-30-49 00 هاتف القسم القنصلي لسفارة السودان في برلين ☎ 60 111 887-30-0049 هاتف القسم القنصلي لسفارة السودان في برلين ☎ 60 111 887-30-0049 هاتف القسم القنصلي لسفارة السودان في برلين ☎ 60 111 887-30-0049 هاتف القسم القنصلي لسفارة السودان في برلين ☎ 60 111 887-30-0049 هاتف القسم القنصلي لسفارة السودان في برلين ☎ 60 111 887-30-0049 هاتف القسم القنصلي لسفارة السودان في برلين ☎ 60 111 887-30-0049

Archaeologist Wraps up Excavation in Tombos, Sudan in River Nile Valley

Michele Buzon

(Amy Patterson Neubert - phys.org) A Purdue University bioarchaeologist finished another field season looking at immigration and colonization during the New Kingdom

occupation of Nubia in about 1400 B.C. along the Nile River Valley.
While most research focuses on Egyptians and their legacy, Michele Buzon, a professor of anthropology, is using health and cultural evidence from more than 3,000-year-old burial sites to understand the lives of Nubians and Egyptians during the New Kingdom Empire. This is when Egyptians colonized the area in about 1500 B.C. to gain access to trade routes on the Nile River.
"Tombos is a colonial cemetery that is related to a town that was built during the New Kingdom occupation of Nubia in about 1400 B.C. And it spans the time period from this New Kingdom colonial period through the Napatan dynasty, the 25th dynasty when Nubia was ruling Egypt," Buzon said. "During the last few field seasons we've been focusing on the elite pyramid tombs to get a sense of who the people – possibly colonists from Egypt – who moved to Nubia were and what their lives were like."
This is the third and final season Buzon and her team have excavated these ancient burial sites as part of a National Science Foundation grant. The project is in collaboration with Stuart Tyson Smith, anthropology professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Purdue doctoral students Katie Whitmore, Sarah Caldwell and Kaitlyn Sanders also participated in the excavation.
"One of the challenges of this season was looking at the very deep pyramid tombs, about 20 feet," said Buzon, who has excavated in the Sudan Desert seven times. "We kept hitting the water table, and the tombs were difficulty to stabilize, and an architect is on site to assist with any stabilization. These deeper tombs are where the elite individuals were buried. We were able to find subsidiary tombs, which are located adjacent to the pyramids, and these were much shallower and in better condition. This gave us an interesting look at a lower class of individuals, and this increased our sample of children which will give us a better understanding of health across the whole life course, thus completing a picture of what health was like in the past."
During the 2017 excavation which concluded in March, the team recovered remains from about 25 individuals which increased the sample size to better determine the health and whether Egyptians and Nubians married. Buzon uses strontium isotope analysis to identify first generation immigrants and paleopathology – the study of ancient diseases. This allows her to evaluate for nutritional deficiencies and evidence of disease. Through cranial measurements and non-metric traits, she can determine biological relatedness between the individuals and combining that with burial positions, she can determine if Egyptians and Nubians intermarried as well as their social status.
The research team also has collected several hundred artifacts from the three seasons. The items range from a small bead to cosmetic tools to a bowl of juniper berries to a mirror to a piece of coffin fragment.

I’m a US doctor just back from Sudan, where hospitality from Muslims greeted me everywhere

Disclosure statement: Richard Gunderman does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above ... more

The surprising country with more pyramids than Egypt – but no tourists

Chris Leadbeater, Travel writer
The wooden door of the tomb is pulled back, and the underworld reaches up to drag us into its dark grip. Holding a low-intensity torch, my guide Hatim El Nour goes first, the meagre beam identifying rough “stairs” in the soil whose edges have been .. more

More Kenyans to benefit from Sudanese scholarships

By AGGREY MUTAMBO The Sudanese government is increasing annual scholarships given to Kenyans in what could be a new initiative to improve Khartoum’s relations with Nairobi.... more

Dr. Tony Andrews, Canadian Geologist: Mining in Sudan is Very Deep-rooted in History

Sudan Vision newspaper interviewed the Canadian geologist, Principal, Centre for Responsible Mineral Development, Dr. Tony Andrews who visited Sudan to take part in the International Mining Forum and.... more

U.S. envoy warns against being too trusting of Sudan's armed opposition

The U.S. envoy to Sudan and South Sudan Donald Booth urged the international community on Wednesday to be clear-eyed in dealing with armed Sudanese opposition groups which put political ambitions above the interests of their own people. ..more

Sudan Bulletin